Category Archives: Sustainablity

Action in harmony with nature.

Thinking across time

 An ancient game board helps me think long-term.

Today I observe living creatures benefit from my oak saplings, I would like living things benefit from them hundreds of years after my death.

Today I observe living creatures benefit from my oak saplings, I would like living things benefit from them hundreds of years after my death.

My oak saplings are two years old, the cat and a ladybird in my photos today benefit from their existence.  My dream, many hundreds of years in the future a child will benefit from shelter or play in the oak trees that my oak saplings will become.

My strategy in business and life is like a game, the oak saplings are parts in the greater game I play, actors that play out their parts hundreds of years after my death.  I recently abandoned a plan to situate these oak saplings in Pitchbury Wood in Colchester when the new owners of that wood revealed their stupidity and lack of care for the living things of that wood.  The new owner, like so many in the modern age, pursue short-term goals, turning the wood into a shooting venue, their conversion of the wood already inflicting great damage to the harmony and life of the wood.  Where I finally locate my oak saplings is part of the long game, one that will see those oak saplings thrive and benefit people hundreds of years from now.

I am the inventor of my interpretation of rules for a game board that was dug up by the archaeologists of my town, a Romano-British strategy game.  I think the game is the same one as described by the Celtic bards known as Fidchell or Gwyddbwyll, which means in the Celtic languages “wood wisdom.”  In the Celtic stories the game is one of the Thirteen Treasures of Britain, a game of destiny, a game played by princes, kings and heroes, that also features in the grail quest.  The archaeology suggests my ancestors  buried the game with a druid in Colchester.

This game board was dug up in a possible druids grave.  The people who play this game no are linking to a common thread of connection between their ancestors and their descendents, who may also play this game.

This game board was dug up in a possible druids grave. The people who play this game now are linking to a common thread of connection between their ancestors and their descendents in Colchester, descendents who may also play this game hundreds of years from now.

I feel like the Celtic hero in the story, I have taken something from the Celtic underworld, this game, something magical that links the past to the future, which unleashed for me a rollercoaster of challenges and opportunity, including this Liberated Way blog.  I am the custodian of a game played by my ancestors, the rulers of Colchester and Britain, a magical treasure; a game that I will bring back to life amongst the living, after hiding in the grave of a highly ranked druid of the first acknowledged King of Britain for two thousand years.

Again, I am thinking hundreds of years into the future, how to deploy the game of my ancestors that my descendents generations from now will continue to play in Colchester.  My Celtic ancestors lived outside of time, past, present and future linked in an unbroken living thread.  It is because of this game I no longer think short-term, and why my strategies build bridges between my ancestors and the future descendents in Colchester.

A policy of non-intervention

Any form of control is contrary to nature.

A picture of harmony. The fox Amber in 2014 sleeping in safety in my garden with my oak saplings.

A picture of harmony. The fox Amber in 2014 sleeping in safety in my garden with my oak saplings.

Control is a human delusion that loves to force everything into a state contrary to its nature, and often into an artificial state of stagnation.  Everything loves to move and change, whilst following a path based upon its internal nature or design.  The example of control and manipulation of food crops through genetic and chemical intervention by corporates such as Monsanto has a track record of producing long-term negative outcomes both in the environment and in the communities it impacts.

Fox hunting is an emotional issue in the UK with the Government about to vote on a measure next week which effectively legalises hunting foxes with dozens of hounds.  Fox hunting is a national sport of the wealthier section of British society which divides those living in the countryside who favour it against those who live in the urban areas who are against it.

I and my business has a non-intervention policy, which means I will not force my will upon society or the environment, since this is contrary to living in harmony with nature.  I can put on public record to a certain politician who will vote in favour of fox-hunting next week that I will blacklist them from doing business with me if they do vote to hunt foxes.  Whilst this action will probably have little impact upon how the politician will vote, my little action is in harmony with nature by simply removing any potential support from an individual without trying to control anyone or anything.

Nature shows the reality of life

Nature teaches the meaning of life.

Those who adventure into nature, if observant and open-minded, will learn the meaning of life.  Everything loves life, growth and procreation; which requires strategies to capture or conserve energy.  There is no ending or beginning, merely change and constant motion.  Things die so that another lives, and strife is the supreme agent of all motion and change, the first principle in nature.  These observations are evident everywhere everyday in nature to those willing to take time away from their busy lives to learn.

Below is a video taken of the dramatic events between a rabbit and a snake.  The snake needs to live, so it has preyed on three baby rabbits, killing two.  The mother discovering the tragic scene, attacks the snake, freeing the surviving baby rabbit.  The conflict continues as the snake flees, pursued in an epic duel with the mother rabbit.  These dramatic scenes happen everywhere everyday in nature, a lesson on the meaning of life.

In harmony with nature

The individual can synchronise their life with nature.

Late June and the cherry trees are still yet to have ripe fruit.  I recognise that the climate is awry because everything is out of alignment, such as the UK cherry trees.  Most people fail to notice any of the natural patterns of nature because they are so separated from it.

Late June and the cherry trees are still yet to have ripe fruit. I recognise that the climate is awry because everything is out of alignment, such as the UK cherry trees. Most people fail to notice any of the natural patterns of nature because they are so separated from it.

It rains.  The cat runs inside, jumps on my seat, the warm secure shared space with me.  The cat is fully in harmony with nature.  When the rain stops, the cat will be outside again.  I know tonight the frogs and snails will be out in numbers, thus I am careful where I tread.

Yesterday was the Summer Solstice in Britain, the longest day.  Today marks the beginning of the slide into darkness and cold of winter.  I begin to think of preparing for winter.  I also mark my days by the moon cycles, I cut the lawn every new and full moon.  The last new moon, I decided to miss the cutting of the grass, because the growth of the grass had slowed and the clover were in bloom visited by hundreds of bees.

I have stopped feeding the birds, putting all the feeding stations in storage.  The summer and autumn are a time of abundance, and the nesting season is over.  I will begin again to feed the birds 1st November, the day that marks the first day of winter.

I no longer bother setting the alarm clock, I naturally wake up before 6am.  I tend to retire to bed before midnight, and mark time by the position and setting of the sun.

This weekend I will be going to a wild food fair to learn about bushcraft, foraging and making stone tools.

Bit by bit I work to live in harmony with nature, a gradual process.

Relearning lost knowledge of the ancestors

It is sad that so much knowledge from ancestors has been lost.

Knowing where to find a puffball is down to local knowledge.  Ignorant people often kick puffballs to bits, one puffball took me several days to eat.

Knowing where to find a puffball is down to local knowledge. Ignorant people often kick puffballs to bits, one puffball took me several days to eat.

I attended a talk in Colchester last night by an expert on bushcraft and foraging.  It is astonishing to realise that so much knowledge such as the properties of plants, and the most basic of skills such as making fires is lost to most people

The expert claimed that  propolis, the sealant bees use to protect their hive with, has medical properties that can clear up a toothache and a foot verruca inside a few days, because it kills bacteria and viruses.

I was able to taste wild foraged food, the wild horseradish that had my eyes watering.  The expert was able to creatively use their knowledge of plants to create a wide range of unique sauces and dips.

The modern age has made people lazy and ignorant, preferring to pay for low quality and expensive solutions to common problems oblivious of the free and high quality solutions provided in nature.

Share the space

The ability to share space with other living things creates harmony.

I often share my space with this cat.

I often share my space with this cat.

It rains outside.  A wet cat lands upon a chair, meowing to me.  I move to the edge of my seat, and pull the curtains back at the window.  I invite the waiting cat to sit with me.  As I type this post, there is a cat on my seat beside me, purring and looking out of the window upon her domain.  I am sharing the space.

The council of my town of Colchester is building hundreds of miles of cycle paths.  Near many of these cycle paths is a sign: “share the space.”  Pedestrian and cyclist now share these paths, mindful to respect the other in using this shared space.  Around Britain duck lanes now exist, a reminder to cyclists and pedestrians that they share the space with river birds beside the rivers and canals.

Sustainability is about acting in harmony with nature, which is possible if people share their space with other living things.

Giving animals a hand

Everyone can make an individual difference to animals.

Simple actions can make a difference for a wild animal.

Individuals have a positive impact on a few wild animals with simple actions.

Life often surprises with weird coincidence.  Even though I try to keep intervention in the lives of wildlife to a minimum, the beautiful little green beetle was trying to cross a busy path, its potential doom a crushing death under a human foot.

I watched as one pedestrian walked by oblivious of the beetle they nearly stood on; I decided to intervene.  I by chance had a Colchester Zoo leaflet which had the strap line “giving animals a hand!”  which I used to move the beetle to safety in the vegetation it was heading for.  I smiled at the interesting synchronicity of helping the beetle with a leaflet talking about helping animals.

The challenges of the world might be vast and impossible to overcome, but every individual can have a positive impact in their actions for a few wild animals.